September 30, 2019 Twin Mountain, New Hampshire

A Trip North to Moose Alley

As I headed north from Twin Mountain early in the morning, I became more than a little concerned about the day’s prospects as the thick fog lingered for over two hours and 70 miles of travel.

About all I could shoot in the fog were a couple of closeups of some bright foliage such as this maple …

… and a really interesting clump of sumac.

As always, right click on any image for a larger version in a new tab or window.

At last as I approached Colebrook, NH, the fog lifted and finally I could see some of the color I had been missing.

After an unsuccessful hunt for moose on Moose Alley, all the way to the Canadian border, I turned around and headed back home.

I encountered these wild turkeys, a Mom and her brood, feeding on the shoulder of the very busy highway in front of the Mount Washington Hotel. Mom seemed to be on the watch for cars while the youngsters fed. All through this trip around both Massachusetts and New Hampshire, I have been amazed at the number of turkeys I have seen, easily hundreds so far, from individual Toms to flocks of fifty of more feeding in fields.

No moose on Moose Alley but here on Route 102 in Vermont, right along the Connecticut River, I came around a bend and there this young guy was, casually strolling down the center of the road.

These shots were taken through my windshield as I slowly followed him down the road. Every now and then, for a quarter of a mile, he would stop and gaze back at me, then continue on his way down the road.

Finally, with a car approaching in the opposite direction, he decided to continue his journey in the woods.  With hunting season fast approaching, I hope this young guy becomes a little more cautious stays off the roadways.

With rainy weather predicted, I probably will check out the color on the Kancamangus Highway early tomorrow morning, then break camp and head to visit my sister in Canaan, NH for a few days and check out the foliage in that area, an area I know well … since I lived in nearby Enfield for over 30 years.

December 31, 2018 Imperial Dam LTVA, California

Anna's Hummingbird
Anna’s Hummingbird

Settling In at the LTVA

I am slowly adjusting to life in the desert once again after just barely making a safe escape from winter in Bend, Oregon. As would be expected, the weather has been delightful, sunny and 60’s by day and cool temps in the 40 ‘s for perfect sleeping weather at night. The constant northerly winds do make my bird photography challenging and when it gusts up to 30 mph I just give up and retreat inside.

Female Anna's Hummingbird
Female Anna’s Hummingbird

The Anna’s hummingbirds were here to greet me even before I got around to setting out the sugar water for them. A few Ocotillos are in bloom around the Yuma Proving Grounds and out in the desert surrounding were I am camped so I am able to grab a bloom now and then to get some nice shots of these guys feeding on their natural foods. I have to confess I have no idea what these little guys are feeding on right now as I can see nothing in bloom, other than the very few aforementioned Ocotillos.

Anna's Hummingbird
Anna’s Hummingbird
Female Anna's Hummingbird
Female Anna’s Hummingbird

As I recall from last year, it took a while to entice other birds in to the feeders but eventually they did show up in fairly good numbers.

House Finches
House Finches

So far, only a lone pair of House Finches has shown up along with …

Gambel's Quail
Gambel’s Quail

… a few Gambel’s Quail.

Gambel's Quail
Gambel’s Quail

And the few quail that have come in so far are extremely wary and scatter at the slightest sound or movement, and with the constant wind here, there always is something being blown around.

Coyote
Unwelcome Observer

One very unwelcome guest is this guy, seemingly keeping a close eye on any potential meals I may attract for him, avian or small canines, in other words, Pearl.  I am keeping a close eye on Pearl any time we are outside and have a short leash on her when I let her out at night so that she can’t wander more than a few feet from the door where I stand sentry.

June 28, 2018 Port Townsend, Washington

Blacktail Twins
Blacktail Twins

Fawns, Flowers, and Whale Watching

Lounging Blacktail Bucks
Lounging Blacktail Bucks

Port Townsend has a large intown resident deer population, and some would say, a large intown deer problem. Click here and here for local news articles on these urban deer.

Blacktail Buck
Blacktail Buck

It is difficult to drive anywhere in the residential part of town without encountering these beautiful animals.

Backyard Grazing
Backyard Grazing

As a person that formerly maintained a large collection of perennials in gardens around my home and business, I can’t imagine what the folks here in Port Townsend have to put up with in trying to maintain their gorgeous landscaping.

Blacktail Mom and Twins
Blacktail Mom and Twins
Blacktail Twins
Blacktail Twins

As a tourist here, I enjoy being able to see and photograph these youngsters, there really are few animals as cute as these guys.

Blacktail Fawn
Blacktail Fawn
Blacktail Twins
Blacktail Twins

To the many serious gardeners here in Port Townsend, I am sure it’s a different story.

Blacktail Twins
Blacktail Twins
Blacktail Twins
Blacktail Twins

These youngsters obviously can’t read that they are not supposed to be here.

Port Townsend Flowers
Port Townsend Flowers

And here is the reason the inner city is so popular with all these deer, just an unlimited buffet of delectable gourmet deer food.

Port Townsend Flowers
Port Townsend Flowers
Port Townsend Flowers
Port Townsend Flowers

Many gardeners in town have erected deer fencing in an effort to keep the deer out. Local ordinances limit the height of any fences to six feet, not an unsurmountable height for for some of these deer.

Port Townsend Flowers
Port Townsend Flowers
Port Townsend Flowers
Port Townsend Flowers

A drive around town reveals some very impressive landscaping. I envy the ability to grow such a wide diversity of plants in this environment. The difference in available plant selection in Zone 4 where I gardened and here in Zone 8 is huge. Don’t envy them the challenge of growing some of these flowers amongst the deer herds though.

Port Townsend Flowers
Port Townsend Flowers
Port Townsend Flowers
Port Townsend Flowers
Port Townsend Flowers
Port Townsend Flowers

Some wonderful dogwoods in bloom right now.

Port Townsend Flowers
Port Townsend Flowers
Tree Bark
Tree Bark

Even the bark of some of the trees is photo worthy.

Humpback Whale
Humpback Whale

Whale Watching Trip on the Redhead

Humpback Whale
Humpback Whale

A four hour whale watching trip out of Port Townsend was a wonderful way to enjoy a beautiful calm and sunny day ( the only one here so far ).

Orcas
Orcas

The whale watching part of the trip was actually kind of disappointing …

Orcas
Orcas

… spotting only one lone Humpback Whale and one small pod of transient Orcas or Killer Whales.

Orcas
Orcas

Regulations require all boats to remain at least 200 yards from the Orcas and 100 yards from other whales and our captain certainly didn’t come close to violating those rules. I would say we never got within 500 yards of the Orcas, thats over a quarter of a mile away, meaning you could barely discern their large dorsal fins poking out of the water and certainly could not get any kind of decent images of their activity.

Container Ship
Container Ship

But spending four hours on the calm waters of Puget Sound on a nice day was a welcome change of pace for me and there were other interesting sights to see out on the water.

Sea Lions
Sea Lions
Fort Worden Lighthouse
Fort Worden Lighthouse

The Fort Worden Lighthouse is much more scenic from the water than it is from land.

I hope to remain here in Port Townsend through the 4th of July week and then will venture farther out onto the Olympic Peninsula after the holiday week, hoping I might then be able to find a place to stay.

Thank you for shopping Amazon from my site!

When you click ( on the image below) through to shop Amazon from here, I get a tiny commission, one that does not in any way impact what you pay, and all those tiny commissions eventually add up and that helps me keep this blog going !


 

 

June 2, 2018 Grand Teton National Park

Grand Teton Bison
Classic Western Scene

Last of the Wildlife Shots From Grand Teton

This park is proving to be a great spot for wildlife photos in the spring. I had been visualizing a shot such as the one above since I arrived here and heading back to the campground the other day, here they were, a small group of bison heading down to the Morman Farm area and needing to cross the road just as I was passing by.

Pronghorns
Pronghorns

And farther up the road, on the same day, this group of female pronghorns, grazing amongst the Arrowleaf Balsamroot flowers. I had really hoped to finally get some shots of some pronghorn fawns but I guess I am just a little too early for that as these gals look like they are still a week or so away from having little ones.

Bear #399 and Cubs
Bear #399 and Cubs

I briefly ran into Bear #399 and her cubs again, though this time only for a brief moment as they crossed a meadow and quickly disappeared into the woods.

Retreating Elk with Calf
Retreating Elk with Calf

Finally I have seen a new born elk calf, though I couldn’t get a decent shot of it as mom hastily retreated when I appeared on the scene. At least I know that they are giving birth at this time, though I have seen very few elk cows out and about recently.

River Otters
River Otters

Jackson Lake Dam Outlet

I spent some time at the outlet below the dam on Jackson Lake yesterday and was surprised at the amount of activity there. I had stopped just to watch the shore fisherman and see what they were catching ( small Lake Trout and some Cut throat Trout ).

River Otter
River Otter

While watching the fisherman casting from shore I noticed a pair of River Otters diving in the rushing waters coming out of the dam. Unfortunately I missed getting the best shots as the pair would catch a fish, dash ashore and climb the bank, then rush across thirty feet of open ground to some bushes, where they would be mobbed by three young otters they were delivering the fish to. All quickly disappeared back into the brush to eat and then the adults would return to the river to fish again.

Common Mergansers
Common Mergansers

Also actively fishing the churning waters were a small group of Common Mergansers, here seen resting on shore before heading out into the rapids.

Common Merganser Pair
Common Merganser Pair
Common Merganser Pair
Common Merganser Pair
Common Mergansers
Common Mergansers

They concentrated their efforts at the edge of the rushing waters exiting the dam, most likely picking off fish that were stunned as they came through the dam.

White Pelican
White Pelican

A pair of White Pelicans were also working the same area.

White Pelicans
White Pelicans
Trail Obstruction
Trail Obstruction

One morning I noticed a few large Bison Bulls as I was driving the main road in the park and pulled off and parked and headed down a trail through the willows to see if I could get a closer shot of them. As I rounded a corner of the trail, I ran into a trail obstruction, in the form of the aforementioned Bison. The three bulls stared at me as I looked around for the safest way out of this situation. Two of the bison turned and jumped over the fence you see on the right, clearing the top rail with their front legs but loudly crashing the rail as their bellies came down on the fence. The third bison simply stood his ground, so I retreated back to my parked car.

Grand Teton Bison
Grand Teton Bison
Grand Teton Bison
Grand Teton Bison

You just can’t appreciate just how large these animals are until you are face to face with them. Very powerful animals.

Thank you for shopping Amazon from my site!

When you click ( on the image below) through to shop Amazon from here, I get a tiny commission, one that does not in any way impact what you pay, and all those tiny commissions eventually add up and that helps me keep this blog going !